Business to Government in Canada | Bids and Bid Preparation

Bids and Bid Preparation | Government of CanadaSuppliers normally prepare bids in response to a Request for Proposal (RFP)– these can be found on the Merx website. Departments go through PWGSC to use the open bidding process when they can’t get what they need from an existing Standing Offer or Supply Arrangement, and the anticipated contract value exceeds the sole-source limit.

RFP’s have a number of components, and PWGSC is very strict about suppliers following the instructions which come with each RFP. If you don’t, then there is an excellent chance that your bid will not be successful.

There are mandatory requirements in each RFP, as well as rated criteria, all of which must have a response. One approach to ensuring your proposal meets all of the requirements of the proposal is to prepare a spreadsheet which lists all of the requirements. You can then prepare the proposal, and note on the spreadsheet where in the proposal (which section/page number) you have addressed each item. Include the spreadsheet at the beginning of your proposal – not only will this approach ensure you have covered everything you need to, it will also provide a handy reference document for people reviewing and rating your proposal.

One point PWGSC makes on its website is not to contact people you know in the department sponsoring the RFP. The only people you can talk to without jeopardizing your bid are at PWGSC, and their names are listed on the RFP. In the interests of fairness, if you ask a question about an RFP, the question and answer will be sent to all suppliers who are involved in the process – those who have received a copy of the RFP.

If you are responding to RFP’s on an ongoing basis, it might be useful not to use boilerplate responses to some of the standard questions, such as those relating to the qualifications and experience of individuals you might be proposing to work on a certain contract. It’s very easy to fall into the habit of using stock CV’s for example, which might not clearly reflect or properly emphasize the relevant skills and abilities of the people you are proposing.

Keep your proposal clear, concise, to the point, and address all of the requirements. Remember, often there are a large number of proposals which are received and must be evaluated. The more you facilitate the reviewers’ work, the more favourably your proposal will be viewed, particularly in cases of ambiguity or lack of clarity.

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It also pays to get to know both the departmental potential clients and procurement staff. This may give you the advantage of understanding to some degree how they think, how they view suppliers, and what their unwritten expectations might be.Bids and Bid Preparation | Government of CanadaSuppliers normally prepare bids in response to a Request for Proposal (RFP)– these can be found on the Merx website. Departments go through PWGSC to use the open bidding process when they can’t get what they need from an existing Standing Offer or Supply Arrangement, and the anticipated contract value exceeds the sole-source limit.
RFP’s have a number of components, and PWGSC is very strict about suppliers following the instructions which come with each RFP. If you don’t, then there is an excellent chance that your bid will not be successful.
There are mandatory requirements in each RFP, as well as rated criteria, all of which must have a response. One approach to ensuring your proposal meets all of the requirements of the proposal is to prepare a spreadsheet which lists all of the requirements. You can then prepare the proposal, and note on the spreadsheet where in the proposal (which section/page number) you have addressed each item. Include the spreadsheet at the beginning of your proposal – not only will this approach ensure you have covered everything you need to, it will also provide a handy reference document for people reviewing and rating your proposal.
One point PWGSC makes on its website is not to contact people you know in the department sponsoring the RFP. The only people you can talk to without jeopardizing your bid are at PWGSC, and their names are listed on the RFP. In the interests of fairness, if you ask a question about an RFP, the question and answer will be sent to all suppliers who are involved in the process – those who have received a copy of the RFP.
If you are responding to RFP’s on an ongoing basis, it might be useful not to use boilerplate responses to some of the standard questions, such as those relating to the qualifications and experience of individuals you might be proposing to work on a certain contract. It’s very easy to fall into the habit of using stock CV’s for example, which might not clearly reflect or properly emphasize the relevant skills and abilities of the people you are proposing.
Keep your proposal clear, concise, to the point, and address all of the requirements. Remember, often there are a large number of proposals which are received and must be evaluated. The more you facilitate the reviewers’ work, the more favourably your proposal will be viewed, particularly in cases of ambiguity or lack of clarity.
It also pays to get to know both the departmental potential clients and procurement staff. This may give you the advantage of understanding to some degree how they think, how they view suppliers, and what their unwritten expectations might be.
Public Sector Lists|Public Sector ConsultingBids and Bid Preparation | Government of CanadaSuppliers normally prepare bids in response to a Request for Proposal (RFP)– these can be found on the Merx website. Departments go through PWGSC to use the open bidding process when they can’t get what they need from an existing Standing Offer or Supply Arrangement, and the anticipated contract value exceeds the sole-source limit.
RFP’s have a number of components, and PWGSC is very strict about suppliers following the instructions which come with each RFP. If you don’t, then there is an excellent chance that your bid will not be successful.
There are mandatory requirements in each RFP, as well as rated criteria, all of which must have a response. One approach to ensuring your proposal meets all of the requirements of the proposal is to prepare a spreadsheet which lists all of the requirements. You can then prepare the proposal, and note on the spreadsheet where in the proposal (which section/page number) you have addressed each item. Include the spreadsheet at the beginning of your proposal – not only will this approach ensure you have covered everything you need to, it will also provide a handy reference document for people reviewing and rating your proposal.
One point PWGSC makes on its website is not to contact people you know in the department sponsoring the RFP. The only people you can talk to without jeopardizing your bid are at PWGSC, and their names are listed on the RFP. In the interests of fairness, if you ask a question about an RFP, the question and answer will be sent to all suppliers who are involved in the process – those who have received a copy of the RFP.
If you are responding to RFP’s on an ongoing basis, it might be useful not to use boilerplate responses to some of the standard questions, such as those relating to the qualifications and experience of individuals you might be proposing to work on a certain contract. It’s very easy to fall into the habit of using stock CV’s for example, which might not clearly reflect or properly emphasize the relevant skills and abilities of the people you are proposing.
Keep your proposal clear, concise, to the point, and address all of the requirements. Remember, often there are a large number of proposals which are received and must be evaluated. The more you facilitate the reviewers’ work, the more favourably your proposal will be viewed, particularly in cases of ambiguity or lack of clarity.
It also pays to get to know both the departmental potential clients and procurement staff. This may give you the advantage of understanding to some degree how they think, how they view suppliers, and what their unwritten expectations might be.
Public Sector Lists|PublBids and Bid Preparation | Government of CanadaSuppliers normally prepare bids in response to a Request for Proposal (RFP)– these can be found on the Merx website. Departments go through PWGSC to use the open bidding process when they can’t get what they need from an existing Standing Offer or Supply Arrangement, and the anticipated contract value exceeds the sole-source limit.
RFP’s have a number of components, and PWGSC is very strict about suppliers following the instructions which come with each RFP. If you don’t, then there is an excellent chance that your bid will not be successful.
There are mandatory requirements in each RFP, as well as rated criteria, all of which must have a response. One approach to ensuring your proposal meets all of the requirements of the proposal is to prepare a spreadsheet which lists all of the requirements. You can then prepare the proposal, and note on the spreadsheet where in the proposal (which section/page number) you have addressed each item. Include the spreadsheet at the beginning of your proposal – not only will this approach ensure you have covered everything you need to, it will also provide a handy reference document for people reviewing and rating your proposal.
One point PWGSC makes on its website is not to contact people you know in the department sponsoring the RFP. The only people you can talk to without jeopardizing your bid are at PWGSC, and their names are listed on the RFP. In the interests of fairness, if you ask a question about an RFP, the question and answer will be sent to all suppliers who are involved in the process – those who have received a copy of the RFP.
If you are responding to RFP’s on an ongoing basis, it might be useful not to use boilerplate responses to some of the standard questions, such as those relating to the qualifications and experience of individuals you might be proposing to work on a certain contract. It’s very easy to fall into the habit of using stock CV’s for example, which might not clearly reflect or properly emphasize the relevant skills and abilities of the people you are proposing.
Keep your proposal clear, concise, to the point, and address all of the requirements. Remember, often there are a large number of proposals which are received and must be evaluated. The more you facilitate the reviewers’ work, the more favourably your proposal will be viewed, particularly in cases of ambiguity or lack of clarity.
It also pays to get to know both the departmental potential clients and procurement staff. This may give you the advantage of understanding to some degree how they think, how they view suppliers, and what their unwritten expectations might be.
Public Sector Lists|Public Sector ConsultingBids and Bid Preparation | Government of CanadaSuppliers normally prepare bids in response to a Request for Proposal (RFP)– these can be found on the Merx website. Departments go through PWGSC to use the open bidding process when they can’t get what they need from an existing Standing Offer or Supply Arrangement, and the anticipated contract value exceeds the sole-source limit.
RFP’s have a number of components, and PWGSC is very strict about suppliers following the instructions which come with each RFP. If you don’t, then there is an excellent chance that your bid will not be successful.
There are mandatory requirements in each RFP, as well as rated criteria, all of which must have a response. One approach to ensuring your proposal meets all of the requirements of the proposal is to prepare a spreadsheet which lists all of the requirements. You can then prepare the proposal, and note on the spreadsheet where in the proposal (which section/page number) you have addressed each item. Include the spreadsheet at the beginning of your proposal – not only will this approach ensure you have covered everything you need to, it will also provide a handy reference document for people reviewing and rating your proposal.
One point PWGSC makes on its website is not to contact people you know in the department sponsoring the RFP. The only people you can talk to without jeopardizing your bid are at PWGSC, and their names are listed on the RFP. In the interests of fairness, if you ask a question about an RFP, the question and answer will be sent to all suppliers who are involved in the process – those who have received a copy of the RFP.
If you are responding to RFP’s on an ongoing basis, it might be useful not to use boilerplate responses to some of the standard questions, such as those relating to the qualifications and experience of individuals you might be proposing to work on a certain contract. It’s very easy to fall into the habit of using stock CV’s for example, which might not clearly reflect or properly emphasize the relevant skills and abilities of the people you are proposing.
Keep your proposal clear, concise, to the point, and address all of the requirements. Remember, often there are a large number of proposals which are received and must be evaluated. The more you facilitate the reviewers’ work, the more favourably your proposal will be viewed, particularly in cases of ambiguity or lack of clarity.
It also pays to get to know both the departmental potential clients and procurement staff. This may give you the advantage of understanding to some degree how they think, how they view suppliers, and what their unwritten expectations might be.
Public Sector Lists|Public Sector Consulting
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